2018 Encounters

Encounter #3 - Jan 27, 2018
T124A

T124A

Photo by Dave Ellifrit

T100C

T100C

Photo by Dave Ellifrit

T124A4

T124A4

Photo by Dave Ellifrit

T124A4

T124A4

Photo by Dave Ellifrit

T100C

T100C

Photo by Dave Ellifrit

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Photos taken under Federal Permits

NMFS PERMIT: 15569-01/ DFO SARA 388

Date: 27-Jan-18

Sequence: 1

Encounter Number: 03

Enc Start Time: 16:30

Enc End Time: 16:40

Vessel: Orcinus

Observers: Dave Ellifrit

Pods or ecotype: Transients

Location: Haro Strait

Begin Lat/Long: 48 35.31/123 13.34

End Lat/Long: 48 35.31/123 13.34

 

Encounter Summary:

Jeanne Hyde called Dave at home at 1555 to relay a report that “Peregrine” had found transients in Boundary Pass and that they were charging south at Turn Point. Dave sped to Snug Harbor and left at about 1615. The sun was about to hit clouds hanging low over Vancouver Island and the seas were not calm so there would not be much time. Luckily, the whales were already off south Kellett Bluff and about mid-strait when “Orcinus” arrived on scene at about 1630. “Peregrine” reported finding another group on their way south that they believed to be the T18s after their original group headed off in the direction of Halibut Island. Dave was just arriving on scene and saw a straight-finned male spread out from another couple of other whales heading north when a large group of females, juveniles, and a sprouter appeared in a tight ball much closer. This was “Peregrine’s” original group and it included the T100s, including the T100Bs, and the T124As minus the T124A2s. The whales appeared to be socializing and were surfacing boisterously in a tight group pointed south. There was at least one spyhop. It was quickly getting dark and there were lots of large, scary looking logs bouncing around in choppy water so there was only time to stay for a couple of surfacings. Since these are not the type of conditions to push one’s luck with daylight, Dave left at about 1640 after it was obvious the whales weren’t coming up anytime soon or anywhere close after their first long dive. Jeanne Hyde reported hearing what could have be these same Ts being chatty on the Lime Kiln hydrophone in the early hours of the next morning.